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Repair and Improvement of N’wamankena Dam

Repair and Improvement of N’wamankena Dam

Project Brief Repair and Improvement of Nwamankena Dam Background Nwamankena Dam is located along the non-perennial Metsemola River, approximately 17 km west of Giyani in The Limpopo Province. It is situated adjacently to two villages of Nwamankena East and West in Ward 8 of Greater Giyani Municipality, within the Mopani district. The dam is an earth-fill dam, constructed mainly for stock watering purposes. Its original construction involved scooping of naturally-occurring top soil underlying weathered bedrockwhich was used to construct a low wall with moderately steep sides. The dam wall included an unlined overflow canal at the southern end tunnel of the wall which was excavated into weathered bedrock. The dam serves six villages, namely:Dingamazi; Ximange; Skhiming; Basani; Silawa and N’wamankena. Causes of Dam Failure The dam was built with an inadequate overflow spillway facility, resulting in overtopping during flood events. The combination of erodability of the construction material and the unevenness of the dam wall across its span, culminated in erosion of the crest, particularly around the central part. The vulnerable dam wall suffered catastrophic breaches of the left embankment on four occasions, the last being in 2005. Thereafter, the dam could no longer hold water. The erosion caused a gully downstream, which required rehabilitation. The Repair and Improvement of the Dam Wall The Department of Water Affairs felt the need to restore the dam wall so as to enable the local community to get water for their livestock and open up new opportunities. Following successful planning, geo-hydrological assessment, and design and procurement processes for the necessary service providers, the project was launched on the 1st of December 2010...
Capacity Building on the Rural Household Infrastructure Programme

Capacity Building on the Rural Household Infrastructure Programme

Government policy encourages community participation in all its programmes, but this engagement needs to be supported by capacity building that will ensure that communities have the capacity to join those programmes. Currently, the youth, women, as well as the disabled do not participate in the government entrepreneur and many other programmes because of a lack of experience and required skills. However, Capacity building, such as those offered by The Mvula Trust, allows communities to take up the issues and opportunities that matter to them. It also allows for a shift from a passive, blaming culture to one of activity, integration and shared endeavor. 519 households on farms in Warden, Vrede, Roadside and Memel, within the Phumelela Local Municipality in Free State benefited from the Rural Household Infrastructure Programme (RHIP) in 2012. Less than 5% of these households have access to electricity and the access to radio and television is accordingly very low. As a result, it stands at approximately 10%. Their access to water is, however, high, as the households access the water that is available for irrigation on the farm. The Mvula Trust facilitated stakeholder meetings with the identified communities in order to allow the community to identify their own community learning and development areas within the scope of the project. It also worked with other community-based organisations and community contractors in order to support the skills development and confidence of the development workers in those organizations. Identified community contractors were eventually short listed to five organizations and those companies were skilled on how to provide and manage the construction services that they were contracted with. The Mvula...
When accountability becomes a dynamic driver of performance in sanitation projects

When accountability becomes a dynamic driver of performance in sanitation projects

True accountability lies in fostering meaningful relationships between people and institutions so that those with power are answerable to those whom such power impacts. The community-based approach to project management and infrastructure creation that The Mvula Trust uses has many advantages including ensuring greater accountability to beneficiaries. Its’ document management processes, as well as stakeholder engagement activities are integral elements to The Mvula Trust community-based approach. During the 2012 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements funded sanitation services to the villages of lower Sitholeni, Mncayi and Sentube in the Engcobo local municipality of the Chris Hani District Municipality in the Eastern Cape. The minimum income received by households here is R270 per household, which they get from the social grant for their children and the maximum is R1200 which is the elderly people grant. Therefore, on average, the income for each household is R735. There is no electricity in the villages and there is therefore no access to televisions, with the exception of a few households that use generators for electricity generation. The Mvula Trust community-based approach was implemented towards managing the project and the implementation therefore had to be as participatory as possible. The Mvula Trust took special care in ensuring that project steering committee (PSC) meetings and site meetings were held timeously in order to monitor project progress. In these meetings, the stakeholders, including the funder, councillors, ward committees, contractors, as well as the newly trained village health workers (VHWs) were also invited in order to address any challenges. Delays, anticipated conflict or misunderstandings were therefore attended to while contingency plans were put into place....
Bucket Eradication is restoration of dignity

Bucket Eradication is restoration of dignity

The South African unjust past laws have left a large majority of citizens with inappropriate, unsafe services which have negatively impacted their health, well-being, dignity and integrity. Privacy is a right cherished by all, particularly when it comes to sanitation matters. The Department of Water Affairs and Sanitation’s motto is ‘Water is life, Sanitation is dignity’. Everybody who has experienced the bucket system as a form of sanitation will know that it is a form that certainly does not ensure users dignity and integrity. The users of this system loathed it since its inception and had hoped to see a fundamental change in the dawn of democracy. However, this has not materialised for many but where this has happened, jubilation from beneficiaries is immeasurable. By September 2014, there were 282 000 households still using the bucket system (Internet Article by Hon. Minister Mokonyane). This means government has worked hard to restore peoples’ dignity, such as in the Sol Plaaitjie Local Municipality and specifically in Kimberly in the wards of Frazer Moleketi and Motswedimosa. Sedibeng Water appointed The Mvula Trust in August 2014 to provide social facilitation services to their Bucket Eradication project in Ritchie, Kimberly. This decision follows recognition by Sedibeng Water that some of the projects they have implemented lack community ownership, thus are likely to be unsustainable. Sedibeng Water appreciates The Mvula Trust’s community-based approach to development, hence they have chosen to appoint The Mvula Trust to facilitate services that would ensure that the new and upgraded infrastructure in the above mentioned wards would be properly operated and well maintained by the beneficiaries. Sedibeng Water, through its appointed...
Women Empowerment and Participation in Rural Household Sanitation Service Delivery

Women Empowerment and Participation in Rural Household Sanitation Service Delivery

While its Community-Based Approach to infrastructure construction and project management is widely recognized, a different approach was employed by The Mvula Trust in order to stimulate a greater participation of female contractors in sanitation and water facilities construction. In an attempt to achieve greater participation from female entrepreneurs in its sanitation construction programmes, The Mvula Trust lowered the entry requirement for contractors to CIDB1, with no construction experience required. This strategy required additional support to the widely recognized community-based approach to project management and infrastructure creation methods of The Mvula Trust. As most of the contractors had little or no construction experience at the time of appointment, on-the-job construction techniques and invoicing training, mentorship support and regular monitoring was provided by The Mvula Trust. The nurturing of the emerging contractors included assisting with cession agreements with selected building materials’ suppliers in order to minimize cash flow challenges and delays in delivering supplies to sites. These and other measures form part of The Mvula Trust’s approach to the empowerment of contractors and community workers. The understanding and partnership of key role players including the National Department of Human Settlements and the Joe Gqabi district municipality was vital, as additional challenges surfaced including low accessibility of certain villages due to poor road networks. This “dis-incentive” of social grant payments often contributed to a lack of available labour in villages and these often delayed project completion. The household sanitation programme in the Joe Gqabi district is funded through both the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and the Rural Household Infrastructure Programme, as coordinated by the National Department of Human Settlements. A number of...